Scientists are using machine learning to interpret “dark matter” DNA

Scientists at Gladstone Institutes are using machine learning to target genetic disorders in so-called genomic “dark matter”.

The computational method being used, called TargetFinder, predicts where non-coding DNA – the DNA that does not code for proteins – interacts with genes. By analysing big data, researchers are abble to connect mutations in genomic “dark matter” with the genes they affect, potentially revealing new targets for genetic disorders.

In the study, published in Nature Genetics, the team from Gladstone Institutes looked at fragments of non-coding DNA called enhancers which act like an instruction manual for a gene, dictating when and where a gene is turned on.

“Most genetic mutations that are associated with disease occur in enhancers, making them an incredibly important area of study,” said the study’s senior author, Katherine Pollard. “Before now, we struggled to understand how enhancers find the distant genes they act upon.”

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The new study revealed that, on a strand of DNA, enhancers can be millions of letters away from the gene they influence.

However, using machine learning technology, the researchers were able to analyse hundreds of existing datasets to look for patterns in the genome and identify where a gene and enhancer interact.

They discovered that when an enhancer is far away from the gene it affects, the two connect by forming a three-dimensional loop, like a bow on the genome.

“It’s remarkable that we can predict complex three-dimensional interactions from relatively simple data,” said biostatistician at Gladstone, Sean Whalen. “No one had looked at the information stored on loops before, and we were surprised to discover how important that information is.”

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The new computational approach is a much cheaper and a less time-consuming way to identify gene-enhancer connections in the genome as performing experiments in the can take millions of dollars and years of research.

The technology also gives an insight into how DNA loops form and how they might break in disease.

“Our ability to predict the gene targets of enhancers so accurately enables us to link mutations in enhancers to the genes they target,” said Pollard. “Having that link is the first step towards using these connections to treat diseases.”

Gladstone is set to offer all of the code and data from TargetFinder online for free.

Australian Prime Minister demands end to encryption

The Australian government has proposed legislation that would force messaging apps like WhatsApp to decrypt encrypted messages. “The laws of mathematics are very commendable, but the only law that applies in Australia is the law of Australia," said Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Source: Independent

James Murdoch joins Tesla's board

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Source: Tech Crunch

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Source: BBC

Samsung's Bixby virtual assistant now available in the US

Samsung has officially rolled out its Bixby voice assistant to S8 and S8 Plus owners in the US, so every American with one of the flagship phones can now talk to their very own virtual assistant. However, it's not currently clear when Bixby will be available in other English-speaking countries or other languages.

Source: Engadget

SpaceX says it can reuse rockets within 24 hours by 2018

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Musk says he has approval for New York to Washington DC tunnel

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You can now explore the International Space Station with Google Street View

If you’ve ever wondered what life is like aboard the International Space Station then Google has a treat in store for you because beginning today the ISS is available via Google Maps’ Street View.

Astronauts have been working and living on the ISS – a structure made up of 15 connected modules that floats 250 miles above Earth – for the past 16 years.

Now with Street View regular citizens can explore the station, and go everywhere from the sleeping quarters to where the space suits are kept. This is the first time Street View has ventured beyond planet Earth, and for the benefit of viewers the Street View feature also comes annotated, with handy little dots you can click on to explain what everything does, which is another first.

“In the six months that I spent on the International Space Station, it was difficult to find the words or take a picture that accurately describes the feeling of being in space,” said European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet in a blog post.

“Working with Google on my latest mission, I captured Street View imagery to show what the ISS looks like from the inside, and share what it’s like to look down on Earth from outer space.”

In his blog post, Pesquet goes on to describe how because of the constraints associated with living and working in space, it wasn’t possible to collect Street View using Google’s usual methods.

Instead, the Street View team worked with NASA at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas and Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama to design a gravity-free method of collecting the imagery using DSLR cameras and equipment already on the ISS.

Still photos were captured in space that were sent down to Earth where they were stitched together to create panoramic 360 degree imagery of the ISS.

Images courtesy of Google

“There are a lot of obstacles up there, and we had limited time to capture the imagery,” recalled Pesquet.

“Oh, and there’s that whole zero gravity thing.”

Pesquet ended his blog post by revealing the inspiration behind the Street View and ISS collaboration.

“Looking at Earth from above made me think about my own world a little differently, and I hope that the ISS on Street View changes your view of the world too.” said Pesquet.