Volkswagen presents the campervan of the future

Volkswagen has presented their answer to the campervan of the future, in the form of the I.D. Buzz concept car. Currently being shown off at the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit, the microbus is electric, all-wheel drive and zero emission.

The Buzz has a range of up to 600km, contains eight seats and space for bikes and boards. The VW campervan has long been a nostalgic throwback and it seems that Volkswagen is determined to build on such an icon and transform it into something a little more suitable for the future.

“The I.D. Buzz stands for the new Volkswagen: modern, positive, emotional, future-orientated. By 2025, we want to sell one million electric cars per year, making e-mobility the new trademark of Volkswagen,” explained Dr Herbert Diess, chairman of the Volkswagen Brand Board of Management.

“The new e-Golf2 already offers 50 percent more electric range. From 2020 onwards we will then launch our ID.family, a new generation of fully electric, fully connected cars. It will be affordable for millions, not just to millionaires.”

The Buzz builds on the I.D.3, Volkswagen’s compact electric car that was the first to go into production based on a new Modular Electric Drive Kit (MEB) and the first VW concept car that can be driven in fully automated mode. The Buzz is now the first minivan to do so and manages the feat with a certain flare.

By pushing the wheel, it melts back into the cockpit of the car and shifts the Buzz into automated mode. In this mode, as the car drives you can spin the driver’s seat to face your passengers while a variety of sensors and cameras, combined with traffic data from the cloud, keep you from a fiery death.

More futuristic yet however, are the augmented reality features. As opposed to a conventional cockpit, the vehicle projects key information via a heads-up display. No longer confined to managing your info via dials or a console hub, it’ll now be 3D and virtual. Additionally, the main controls will all be on the wheel and function through a capacitive touchpad embedded in the wheel.

Images courtesy of Volkswagen

One thing is for sure, this isn’t the hippy-mobile that the classic VW van became iconic as. Whether or not it’s a vehicle we’ll ever realistically see on the road is uncertain but, if successfully manufactured, what the Buzz offers is an experience unlike others.

Currently, there is a big push for autonomous vehicles across brands. This concept goes beyond that idea, however, and it seems that the driving experience is focused on turning the car more into a gadget than just a means of transportation.

The Buzz, alongside its sister I.D.3, does not yet have approvals for sale, and there is no fixed release date for it. The car is currently on display at the NAIAS as part of Volkswagen’s “We make the future real” brand strategy.

If you had to retake control of a driverless car would you be ready?

Researchers from Stanford University have concluded that drivers who retake control of an autonomous car are more likely to be involved in an accident.

The study, published in the first issue of Science Robotics, found that roads could become especially dangerous when drivers made the transition back to being in control of autonomous vehicles due to changes in speed and other changes in driving conditions.

“Many people have been doing research on paying attention and situation awareness. That’s very important,” said lead author of the research and former graduate student in the Dynamic Design Lab at Stanford University, Holly Russell.

“But, in addition, there is this physical change and we need to acknowledge that people’s performance might not be at its peak if they haven’t actively been participating in the driving.”

Featured image courtesy of Steve Jurvetson

Featured image courtesy of Steve Jurvetson

During testing all drivers were given advance warning that they would be put back in control of a driverless car and were given the opportunity to drive around the testing track a number of times, so they could feel for themselves changes in speed or steering that may occur while the car drives itself.

However, during the trial itself, the drivers’ steering manoeuvres differed significantly from their ability when in control of the car from start to finish.

“Even knowing about the change, being able to make a plan and do some explicit motor planning for how to compensate, you still saw a very different steering behaviour and compromised performance,” said co-author of the research and research associate in the Revs Program at Stanford, Lene Harbott.

driverless-cars

Although no driver was so thrown off by the changes in steering that they drove off-course, the fact that there was a period of altered steering behaviour increased the likelihood of an accident occurring.

However, the Stanford study only addressed one specific example of the autonomous car to human driver handover; there is still a lot to learn about how people respond in other circumstances, depending on the type of car, the driver and how the driving conditions have changed.

“If someone is designing a method for automated vehicle handover, there will need to be detailed research on that specific method,” said Harbott. “This study is tip of an iceberg.”