Magnetic ink to make 3D printed, self-healing electronics a reality

A new magnetic ink has been developed that will be capable of being used to create self-healing batteries, electrochemical sensors and wearable, textile-based electrical circuits. The ink has already shown to repair more damage and at a quicker speed than current self-healing systems.

Developed by a team of engineers at the University of California San Diego, the ink’s key ingredient is microparticles that are oriented in a certain configuration by a magnetic field.

Because of the orientation of these particles, any tear in a device printed with the ink will self-heal as particles on both sides of the tear are magnetically attracted to one another.

The ink has already set records by repairing tears as wide as 3mm, a new high in the field of self-healing systems.

“Our work holds considerable promise for widespread practical applications for long-lasting printed electronic devices,” said Joseph Wang, director of the Center for Wearable Sensors and chair of the nanoengineering department at UC San Diego.

A demonstration of the magnetic ink, which was printed as a self-healing circuit onto a t-shirt, before being cut and repairing itself. Image courtesy of Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego

A demonstration of the magnetic ink, which was printed as a self-healing circuit onto a t-shirt, before being cut and repairing itself

In addition to the extent of damage the ink allows devices to repair, it is also notable for its ability to do so without any outside catalyst.

Existing systems require external triggers to begin the healing process, and can take anywhere between a few minutes to several days to do so. By contrast, the new system requires no external trigger and repairs damage within roughly 50 milliseconds.

The engineers tested their system by printing batteries, electrochemical sensors and wearable, textile-based electrical circuits that they then set about damaging by cutting them and pulling them apart to create increasingly wide gaps. The devices were damaged nine times at the same location, as well as having damage inflicted in four different places on the same device.

Despite the extensive and repeated damage, the devices continued to heal themselves and recover function, losing only a minimal amount of conductivity.

For example, a self-healing circuit was printed on the sleeve of a T-shirt and connected to an LED light and a coin battery. The circuit and the fabric it was printed on were then cut, resulting in the LED turning off. Within a few seconds, however, it started turning back on as the two sides of the circuit came together and healed.

A second demonstation of the ink's healing capabilities. Image courtesy of Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego

A second demonstration of the ink’s healing capabilities. Image courtesy of Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego

“We wanted to develop a smart system with impressive self-healing abilities with easy-to-find, inexpensive materials,” said Amay Bandodkar, one of the papers’ first authors, who earned his Ph.D. in Wang’s lab and is now a postdoctoral researcher at Northwestern University.

The engineers envision that, in the future, they will be able to expand the range of applications for the ink by making use of different variations with different ingredients.

Additionally, they plan to test different self-healing ink recipes in silicon through computer simulations, before taking them for lab testing.

Mac spyware stole millions of user images

A criminal case brought against a man from Ohio, US has shed more light on a piece of Mac malware, dubbed Fruitfly, that was used to surreptitiously turn on cameras and microphones, take and download screenshots, log keystrokes, and steal tax and medical records, photographs, internet searches, and bank transactions from users.

Source: Ars Technica

Drone swarm attack strikes Russian military bases

Russia's Ministry of Defence claims its forces in Syria were attacked a week ago by a swarm of home-made drones. According to Russia's MoD Russian forces at the Khmeimim air base and Tartus naval facility "successfully warded off a terrorist attack with massive application of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)"

Source: Science Alert

Las Vegas strip club employs robot strippers

A Las Vegas strip club has flown in robot strippers from London to 'perform' at the club during CES. Sapphire Las Vegas strip club managing partner Peter Feinstein said that he employed the robots because the demographics of CES have changed and the traditional female strippers aren’t enough to lure a crowd to the club anymore.

Source: Daily Beast

GM to make driverless cars without steering wheels or pedals by 2019

General Motors has announced it plans to mass-produce self-driving cars without traditional controls like steering wheels and pedals by 2019. “It’s a pretty exciting moment in the history of the path to wide scale [autonomous vehicle] deployment and having the first production car with no driver controls,” GM President Dan Ammann told The Verge.

Source: The Verge

Russia-linked hackers "Fancy Bears" target the IOC

Following Russia's ban from the upcoming 2018 Winter Olympics, the Russia-linked hacking group "Fancy Bears" has published a set of apparently stolen emails, which purportedly belong to officials from the International Olympic Committee, the United States Olympic Committee, and third-party groups associated with the organisations.

Source: Wired

Scientists discover ice cliffs on Mars

Using images provided by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, scientists have described how steep cliffs, up to 100 meters tall, made of what appears to be nearly pure ice indicate that large deposits of ice may also be located in nearby underground deposits. The discovery has been described as “very exciting” for potential human bases.

Source: Science Mag

Ocado unveils dexterous robot that it hopes will work alongside humans

Fears that robots may one day steal humans’ jobs may be eased a little depending on how the world receives a prototype collaborative robot (cobot) designed to work alongside maintenance technicians.

The EU funded SecondHands project, which kicked off in 2015, aims to build a collaborative robot to offer support to maintenance technicians working in the warehouse of the online supermarket Ocado.

The prototype cobot, revealed today, which has the official title ARMAR-6, will eventually act as a second pair of hands that will assist engineering technicians when they are in need of help, and will be capable of handling tools or manipulating objects like ladders, pneumatic cylinders and bolts.

“I’ve been here for about seven years now and initially I was hired with a view to getting robots to pack the shopping,” said Graham Deacon, Robotics Research team leader at Ocado Technology.

“Things have moved on a bit since then and one of the things that we’re working on now is a project called SecondHands. This is developing a robot to assist our maintenance technicians. It’s called SecondHands because it’s literally meant to be a second pair of hands for the technician to get their work done.”

Ocado’s cobot was developed collaboratively by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Sapienza Università di Roma and University College London.

Images and video courtesy of Ocado

Each research team, together with Ocado’s own robotics department, contributed a different component that when put together make up the complete robot (part of me hopes someone shouted ‘It’s Megazord time’ when they were done with their part).

So, for example, KIT took care of the development of the cobot including its entire mechatronics, software operating system and control as well as robot grasping and manipulation skills, while EPFL handled human-to-robot interactions and action skills learning.

Rather than going straight onto the warehouse floor, the cobot has been delivered to the Ocado Technology robotics research lab where experiments to evaluate the integrated research components from all project partners is currently taking place.

Ocado hasn’t given any indication yet when we can expect the cobot to be working alongside its human brethren.