Scientists make it possible to 3D print your own sonic tractor beam

You can now, with some assembly, 3D print your very own tiny sonic tractor beam.

Thanks to the efforts of a research team at Bristol University, technology for a single-sided acoustic tractor beam has now been adapted to be printed and assembled by anyone with the inclination. The publically available specifications are based on the first single-sided acoustic tractor beam, developed last year.

The original technology was developed by Asier Marzo, then a doctoral student at the Public University of Navarre. The tractor beam, rather than using the long-possible sonic levitation to push objects around, functioned true to its name and was able to trap and pull objects using sound waves from only one direction.

Marzo, now a research assistant at the University of Bristol, led his team in changing the technology into something that anyone could produce. Their efforts, beyond adaptation, have resulted in the production of a fully detailed how-to video for the public and an open access paper in Applied Physics Letters that will lay out the results of their development work.

“Previously we developed a tractor beam, but it was very complicated and pricey because it required a phase array, which is a complex electronic system,” Marzo said. “In this paper, we made a simple, static tractor beam that only requires a static piece of matter.”

The principle change from the original technology to the new, more accessible version was the transition from an underlying complex structure that made use of expensive electronics to an architecture that produces the same results structurally rather than electronically. As the sound passes through these elements, the waves are shaped by the internal structure of the 3D printed material.

The sound wave is modulated using a metamaterial which consists of lots of tubes of varying lengths. After passing through said tubes, the sound has the correct phases to create the tractor beam. However, the team face difficulty in optimising this material design to allow common 3D printers to produce the same results as more precise instruments.

Beyond the simple appeal of owning your own tractor beam, the technology may have serious potential for studying low-gravity effects on biological samples. Microgravity research is already an emerging field of interest and the tractor beam may serve as an effective tool for furthering these studies.

“Recently there have been several papers about what happens if we levitate an embryo, how does it develop? Or what happens if we levitate bacteria?” Marzo said. “For instance, they discovered salmonella is three times more [virulent] when it’s levitated. Certain microorganisms react differently to microgravity.”

There are currently three designs of the tractor beam, each with a trapping profile suited to different object sizes as related to the wavelength of sound used. However, the team’s technology is still limited to objects around half the size of the wavelength. For practical frequencies, just above what humans can hear, this limits the current size of trappable objects to a few millimetres.

China planning to end sales of fossil-fuel-powered vehicles

Xin Guobin, China's vice minister of industry and information technology, has said the government is working with regulators to put in place a timetable to end the production and sale of cars powered by fossil fuels. It's hoped the move will accelerate the expansion of the electric car market.

Source: Bloomberg

Limited Tesla Autopilot was "partly to blame" for crash

The US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has found that Tesla's Autopilot system was partly to blame for a fatal accident in which a Model S collided with a lorry. The safety board concluded that Tesla allowed the driver to use the system outside of the environment for which it was designed,

Source: BBC

Chelsea Manning warns about the risks of AI

During a conversation at Noisebridge hackerspace, Chelsea Manning commented on some of the inherent risks of AI. "We’re now using huge datasets with all kinds of personal data, that we don’t even know what information we’re putting out there and what it’s getting collected for," Manning said.

Source: Ars Technica

US government bans Kaspersky software from its agencies

The Department of Homeland security has ordered government agencies to stop using software products made by Kaspersky Lab because of possible ties between Kaspersky officials and Russian intelligence. The process of discontinuing Kaspersky products is expected to begin within 90 days.

Source: Ars Technica

Hyperloop One selects ten possible routes for the first hyperloop

Hyperloop One has announced that it has selected ten proposed routes for the first hyperloop. The company also announced that it would “commit meaningful business and engineering resources and work closely with each of the winning teams/routes to determine their commercial viability”.

Source: Inverse

Artificial 'skin' gives robotic hand a sense of touch

A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices.

Source: Science Daily

The plan to make every surface inside the car of the future smart

Yanfeng Automotive Interiors (YFAI) has revealed a vision for the future of cars where every surface inside the vehicle can become a smart surface.

Launched at the International Auto Show, YFAI’s activeSkin concept will turn the largely decorative surfaces inside cars, including the door trim, floor console and instrument panel, into smart interior surfaces, which YFAI says will be “fully interactive” and could be ready by 2022.

“The future generation of surfaces will be smarter than ever. Just by passing your hand over a upholstered surface of the car will appear an interactive surface or dynamic decorative ambient light. Surfaces interact with us, “says Han Hendriks , YFAI’s chief technology officer.

“This technology is impressive.”

Images courtesy of YFAI

YFAI says its customisable 3D glass surfaces could benefit drivers by replacing some of the current operating elements in traditional cars.

However, If no information is called up by the driver, integrated screens and operating surfaces would remain invisible as purely decorative glass surfaces, so drivers would not be distracted by unnecessary information popping up.

“We offer on-demand functionality, so it will only be visible when you need it. In this way we will be able to customise features on interior surfaces,” said Hendriks. “With activeSkin we can achieve a 3D effect that gives a feeling of amazing depth.”

This isn’t the first time YFAI has tried to predict what cars of the future will be like.

The company’s XiM17 concept car was designed with autonomous driving in mind and helped answer the question, “What will people do in their vehicle, if they no longer have to drive?”

YFAI’s XiM17 allows passengers to switch between a number of different modes to allow passengers a number of different ways of engaging.

For example, in family mode all four seats in the car are positioned facing each other, whereas in meeting mode the rear seats are folded away. so that the driver and passenger seats face each other. and a floor console rises to form a desk.