Despite a slew of cybersecurity breaches, people still aren’t taking online security seriously

Cybersecurity breaches seem to be a constant part of modern life, with a new high-profile leak or hack happening almost every week. Despite this, however, British people still aren’t taking adequate steps to protect their data, according to findings published by Cyber Security Europe.

In a survey of over 1,000 people living in the UK, almost a quarter – 23% – admitted to regularly using either their name or date of birth as their password in online accounts – an absolute no-no in ensuring a secure account.

Furthermore, 11% – slightly more than one in ten – said that they only use one or two passwords for all their online accounts, meaning that if one were to be breached, hackers could easily gain access to the others.

Even major attacks affecting large percentages of the population don’t seem enough to prompt people to take better cybersecurity precautions, as 76% of people say they never update passwords after a major breach.

British workers are not practices adequate cybersecurity, which is putting businesses at serious risk. Image courtesy of Transport for London

This is particularly bad news for British businesses, which not only have in the past been accused of not doing enough to protect their customers from cybersecurity incidents, but which will be subject to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) from next year, meaning they could be in serious trouble if poor employee practices leave customer data exposed.

Despite this, only 16% of respondents say their workplaces have increased focus on cybersecurity since the WannaCry ransomware attack earlier this year, the most devastating attack to hit UK businesses of late.

In addition, 60% of people said they only used logins and passwords for online security at work, which given how many people use poor passwords, poses a serious security risk for companies.

“A surprising amount of people still seem oblivious to the threat posed to their personal and, in fact, business information by using their name or date of birth as their passwords,” said Bradley Maule-ffinch, director of strategy for Cyber Security Europe.

“Nowadays, this is far from being just a personal issue. We have seen a spate of prolific attacks and breaches this year alone and businesses must ensure that employees are educated about the basics such as password security.

“With the advent of Internet of Things, increasing numbers of people using their own personal devices to connect to business networks which is an ever-growing threat landscape. This could prove a costly vulnerability for organisations in the wake of GDPR.”

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Skydio unveils its obstacle-dodging, thrill-seeking, AI-powered drone

An autonomous drone startup founded by former MIT researchers has today launched its R1, a fully autonomous flying camera that follows its subjects through dense and challenging environments.

In a promotional video, launched to introduce the autonomous camera, R1 can be seen following an athlete as she parkours her way through dense woodland.

The drone’s makers Skydio have explained that the camera combines artificial intelligence, computer vision, and advanced robotics and works by anticipating how people move, so R1 can make intelligent decisions about how to get the smoothest, most cinematic footage in real-time.

“The promise of the self-flying camera has captured people’s imaginations, but today’s drones still need to be flown manually for them to be useful,” said Adam Bry, CEO and co-founder of Skydio.

“We’ve spent the last four years solving the hard problems in robotics and AI necessary to make fully autonomous flight possible. We’re incredibly excited about the creative possibilities with R1, and we also believe that this technology will enable many of the most valuable drone applications for consumers and businesses over the coming years.”

Launching today is the Frontier Edition of R1, which is aimed at athletes, adventurers, and creators.

This version of R1 is powered by the Skydio Autonomy Engine, enabling it to see and understand the world around it so that it can fly safely at speeds of upto 25mph while avoiding obstacles.

The autonomous drone is fitted with 13 cameras, which gives it the ability to map and understand the world in real-time, allowing it to be fully autonomous and independently capture footage that in Skydio’s words “once required a Hollywood film crew” and will “enable a new type of visual storytelling”.

The R1 “Frontier Edition” is available for order now on Skydio’s website for $2,499.