Scientists unlock wireless charging for airborne drones

Using inductive coupling, scientists have made a breakthrough that allows them to wirelessly transfer power to a drone while it is still flying. The technology could open up a host of possibilities, including allowing drones to fly indefinitely, simply hovering over a ground support vehicle when in need of a recharge.

Inductive coupling is a concept originally demonstrated over 100 years ago by Nikola Tesla, the principle being that by tuning two copper coils into each other with electronics, you can enable the wireless exchange of power at a certain frequency.

Inductive coupling has been experimented with for decades, but until now researchers have failed to utilise the technology to wirelessly power flying devices.

The researchers behind the breakthrough, from Imperial College London, demonstrated their method by altering the electronics and removing the battery of an off-the-shelf quadcopter drone.

A receiving antenna was made by encircling the drone’s casing with a copper foil ring, and a transmitter device on the ground was made out of a circuit board and connected to electronics and a power source, creating a magnetic field. The researchers believe that this is the first demonstration to show how this wireless charging method can be efficiently used with a flying object, and expect it to open up a range of potential applications.

“Imagine using a drone to wirelessly transmit power to sensors on things such as bridges to monitor their structural integrity,” explained Professor Paul Mitcheson, from the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Imperial College London. “This would cut out humans having to reach these difficult-to-access places to re-charge them.

“Another application could include implantable miniature diagnostic medical devices, wirelessly powered from a source external to the body. This could enable new types of medical implants to be safely recharged, and reduce the battery size to make these implants less invasive.”

Images courtesy of Imperial College London

Images courtesy of Imperial College London

Drones are currently limited in their commercial usage by the distance they can travel and the duration for which they can do so.

Despite growing possibilities for usage, the limited availability of power and re-charging requirements means that it is hard to make full use of drones in their capacity for roles such as surveillance or search and rescue. The development of efficient wireless power transfer technology would solve these endurance problems and enable a wide range of advancements.

“In the future, we may also be able to use drones to re-charge science equipment on Mars, increasing the lifetime of these billion dollar missions,” added Mitcheson.

“We have already made valuable progress with this technology and now we are looking to take it to the next level.”

For now, the technology is still very much in its infancy and the Imperial team’s technology only allows the drone to fly ten centimetres above the magnetic field transmission source.

However, they are now exploring collaborations with industrial partners, and have estimated that a commercially available product could be ready in a year.

Atari tells fans its new Ataribox console will arrive in late 2018

Atari has revealed more details about its Ataribox videogame console today, with the company disclosing that the console will ship in late 2018 for somewhere between $249 and $299.

Atari says that it will launch the Ataribox on Indiegogo this autumn.

The company said it chose to launch the console in this way because it wants fans to be part of the launch, be able to gain access to early and special editions, as well as to make the Atari community “active partners” in the rollout of Ataribox.

“I was blown away when a 12-year-old knew every single game Atari had published. That’s brand magic. We’re coming in like a startup with a legacy,” said Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac in an interview with VentureBeat.

“We’ve attracted a lot of interest, and AMD showed a lot of interest in supporting us and working with us. With Indiegogo, we also have a strong partnership.”

Images courtesy of Atari

Atari also revealed that its new console will come loaded with “tons of classic Atari retro games”, and the company is also working on developing current titles with a range of studios.

The Ataribox will be powered by an AMD customised processor, with Radeon Graphics technology, and will run Linux, with a customised, easy-to-use user interface.

The company believes this approach will mean that, as well as being a gaming device, the Ataribox will also be able to service as a complete entertainment unit that delivers a full PC experience for the TV, bringing users streaming, applications, social, browsing and music.

“People are used to the flexibility of a PC, but most connected TV devices have closed systems and content stores,” Mac said. “We wanted to create a killer TV product where people can game, stream and browse with as much freedom as possible, including accessing pre-owned games from other content providers.”

In previous releases, Atari has said that it would make two editions of its new console available: a wood edition and a black and red version.

After being asked by many fans, the company has revealed that the wood edition will be made from real wood.

Atari has asked that fans let it know what they think of the new console via its social channels

Scientists, software developers and artists have begun using VR to visualise genes and predict disease

A group of scientists, software developers and artists have taken to using virtual reality (VR) technology to visualise complex interactions between genes and their regulatory elements.

The team, which comprises of members from Oxford University, Universita’ di Napoli and Goldsmiths, University of London, have been using VR to visualise simulations of a composite of data from genome sequencing, data on the interactions of DNA and microscopy data.

When all this data is combined the team are provided with an interactive, 3D image that shows where different regions of the genome sit relative to others, and how they interact with each other.

“Being able to visualise such data is important because the human brain is very good at pattern recognition – we tend to think visually,” said Stephen Taylor, head of the Computational Biology Research Group at Oxford’s MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine (WIMM).

“It began at a conference back in 2014 when we saw a demonstration by researchers from Goldsmiths who had used software called CSynth to model proteins in three dimensions. We began working with them, feeding in seemingly incomprehensible information derived from our studies of the human alpha globin gene cluster and we were amazed that what we saw on the screen was an instantly recognisable model.”

The team believe that being able to visualise the interactions between genes and their regulatory elements will allow them to understand the basis of human genetic diseases, and are currently applying their techniques to study genetic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and multiple sclerosis.

“Our ultimate aim in this area is to correct the faulty gene or its regulatory elements and be able to re-introduce the corrected cells into a patient’s bone marrow: to perfect this we have to fully understand how genes and their regulatory elements interact with one another” said Professor Doug Higgs, a principal researcher at the WIMM.

“Having virtual reality tools like this will enable researchers to efficiently combine their data to gain a much broader understanding of how the organisation of the genome affects gene expression, and how mutations and variants affect such interactions.”

There are around 37 trillion cells in the average adult human body, and each cell contains two meters of DNA tightly packed into its nucleus.

While the technology to sequence genomes is well established, it has been shown that the manner in which DNA is folded within each cell affects how genes are expressed.

“There are more than three billion base pairs in the human genome, and a change in just one of these can cause a problem. As a model we’ve been looking at the human alpha globin gene cluster to understand how variants in genes and their regulatory elements may cause human genetic disease,” said Prof Jim Hughes, associate professor of Genome Biology at Oxford University.