Are Nintendo a software update away from the Virtual Boy Mk2?

The Nintendo Switch has only been out for a few weeks, but we're already wondering what's next from Nintendo. Officially, at least, the Switch is devoid of virtual reality capabilities, but, as we find out, that may not be the case forever

For the first major video games company to release a virtual reality headset, Nintendo sure has been reluctant to join the VR bandwagon now the technology has returned.

Back in 1995, the company released Virtual Boy, the headset that the company’s marketing materials promised would transport the wearer to a new dimension, but in reality provided headache-inducing stereoscopic 3D in a rather hellish combination of red and black.

Yet despite being a critical and commercial failure, the product ensured that Nintendo’s name was firmly tied to virtual reality. So when VR returned as a viable option a few years ago, many were keen to know if the Virtual Boy would be making a comeback.

Sadly, Nintendo had other ideas. The company made little acknowledgement of the rising interest in VR and, when it did speak of the technology, largely expressed scepticism, such as in a talk by Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto during a 2015 investor meeting.

“Many demonstrations for virtual reality devices have been conducted at recent trade shows, and at this year’s E3, I noticed a number of dream-like demonstrations for which the schedule and format for commercialisation are unknown,” the Nintendo legend said.

However, now the Nintendo Switch is a reality, that scepticism appears to be changing.

Nintendo hints at VR planning

In mid-2016 Miyamoto made several comments on Twitter that caused excitement among VR-curious Nintendo fans.

“I heard VR was a hot topic at #E3, so I went to check it out. It was on display, but it wasn’t what I expected,” he wrote in Japanese, with a translation by user Cheesemeister3k. “We’re also researching VR, so we have the core technology.”

This was a big deal. For the first time a senior member in Nintendo was confirming the company was seriously researching virtual reality, suggesting that the company was interested in jumping on the VR bandwagon.

However, Nintendo has never been a company that does things just because everyone else in the industry is doing them. It’s an approach that has at times proved immensely frustrating for fans, but has endured due to the company remaining utterly distinct at a time when triple-A games have sometimes looked highly homogenised.

And it seems that its approach to VR is no different. Miyamoto’s focus appeared to be on making VR work for the Nintendo way of doing things, and he did express some concerns about how this would work.

“Long play sessions are an issue. We want to release something that can be played for long periods, carries value, and is affordable. We want parents to feel at ease.”

This mentality was further confirmed by Nintendo president Tatsumi Kimishima, who in February 2017 told The Nikkei that the company was “studying” VR.

“If we are able to resolve the issues with playing [VR] comfortably for long hours, we will support it in one form or another,” he said.

Nintendo experiments with head-mounted displays

In December 2016, a few short weeks before Nintendo hosted a Direct where it laid out details of its new console, a host of patents related to the Switch were published.

For the most part, the slew of diagrams and supporting text confirmed what most were expecting: Nintendo’s new console was a portable-console hybrid, transitioning between multiple configurations to allow numerous styles of play. But in amongst the careful explanations of the many controller configurations and attachments was something unexpected: a head-mounted display with an unmistakable similarity to the various smartphone-enabled virtual reality devices currently on the market.

Clearly Nintendo had done a bit more than just research VR

Clearly Nintendo had done a bit more than just research VR: the company had given serious thought to how the Switch might be made to work as an HMD. And by the looks of things, it would simply be a matter of sliding the main device into a supporting headset.

“Fig. 60 is a diagram showing an example HMD accessory to which the main unit can be attached. An HMD accessory shown in Fig. 60 includes a housing and belts. One end of the belt is attached to one end of the housing, and one end of the belt is attached to the other end of the housing,” the accompanying text said, in suitably dry patent language.

“Although not shown in the figure, the other end of the belt can be removably connected to the other end of the belt. Thus, the housing can be mounted on the head of the user by connecting together the two belts around the head of the user. Note that there is no particular limitation on the mechanism for allowing the HMD accessory to be mounted on the head of the user.”

Consider the Switch’s controllers for a second

In January 2017, Nintendo finally confirmed details of the Switch, and in doing so also showcased the final piece of the puzzle that would make it truly viable as a virtual reality console: the Joycon controllers. Designed to attach to the sides of the touchscreen for on-the-go gaming, or be removed and used as either motion or conventional controllers, these unconventional devices have elicited mixed reactions from users.

However, whether you see them as an ill-conceived attempt to revive the Wii, or an awesome solution to portable gaming, the fact remains that they would be great with VR.

“The Joycon can convey to you the feeling of ice cubes colliding in a cup,” said Switch producer Yoshiaki Koizumi during the Direct. “They can even tell the number of ice cubes in a glass, and you can feel water filling the glass. This new sense of realism is produced by the precision of HD Rumble.”

As revelations as about controllers go, it didn’t exactly thrill many of the gaming hardcore. But for VR it could be something else. The standard for VR controllers is effectively already motion controllers, but the added HD Rumble could add a whole extra tier of realism to the world of VR.

You heard it here first

Although virtual reality is not officially a part of the Switch’s future, it’s clear that Nintendo is keeping its options open when it comes to VR. And as and when it does decide to add such functionality to the console, it will simply be a matter of releasing the headset as a new accessory and providing a simple software update.

One issue, of course, is power: the Switch would not be a particularly powerful console for virtual reality, and so would likely be on a par with smartphone-based systems rather than anything more powerful.

However, there is undoubtedly a market for a family focused virtual reality system, and Nintendo certainly could fill that niche. The company could even play into the appeal of the retro, by styling the headset like the original Virtual Boy.

With all this in mind, I’m taking the unusual step of ending this article with a series of predictions, because despite Nintendo’s often erratic business practices, it seems very likely that – barring the collapse of the virtual reality industry – the Switch will support VR at some point in the future.

First, I predict that the Switch will have some form of VR support by the end of 2018. This will give Nintendo adequate time to establish the console before adding additional features, but also takes into account the shorter generations that the company appears to be pursuing.

Next, Nintendo will offer two styles of headset: one that is styled in line with the Switch hardware, and another that will be styled like the Virtual Boy. The latter will be available only as a limited run, and most fans will end up paying far more than the retail price as, like the recently released Classic Mini NES, it will be sold out pretty much everywhere.

And finally, Nintendo will offer a VR gaming experience unlike that explored by any other company. Because it wouldn’t be Nintendo if it didn’t offer something completely different than the norm.

DJI’s First Drone Arena in Tokyo to Open This Saturday

Consumer drone giant DJI will open its first Japanese drone arena in the city of Tokyo this Saturday, providing a space for both hardened professionals and curious newcomers to hone their flying skills.

The arena, which covers an area of 535 square metres, will not only include a large flying area complete with obstacles, but also offer a store where visitors can purchase the latest DJI drones and a technical support area where drone owners can get help with quadcopter issues.

The hope is that the arena will allow those who are curious about the technology but currently lack the space to try it out to get involved.

“As interest around our aerial technology continues to grow, the DJI Arena concept is a new way for us to engage not just hobbyists but also those considering this technology for their work or just for the thrill of flying,” said Moon Tae-Hyun, DJI’s director of brand management and operations.

“Having the opportunity to get behind the remote controller and trying out the technology first hand can enrich the customer experience. When people understand how it works or how easy it is to fly, they will discover what this technology can do for them and see a whole new world of possibilities.”

Images courtesy of DJI

In addition to its general sessions, which will allow members of the public to drop by and try their hand at flying drones, the arena will also offer private hire, including corporate events. For some companies, then, drone flying could become the new golf.

There will also be regular events, allowing pros to compete against one another, and drone training, in the form of DJI’s New Pilot Experience Program, for newcomers.

The arena has been launched in partnership with Japan Circuit, a developer of connected technologies, including drones.

“We are extremely excited to partner with DJI to launch the first DJI Arena in Japan,” said Tetsuhiro Sakai, CEO of Japan Circuit.

“Whether you are a skilled drone pilot or someone looking for their first drone, we welcome everyone to come and learn, experience it for themselves, and have fun. The new DJI Arena will not only serve as a gathering place for drone enthusiasts but also help us reach new customers and anyone interested in learning about this incredible technology.”

The arena is the second of its kind to be launched by DJI, with the first located in Yongin, South Korea, and detailed in the video above. .

Having opened in 2016, the area has attracted visitors from around the world, demonstrating serious demand for this type of entertainment space.

If the Tokyo launch goes well, it’s likely DJI will look at rolling out its arena concept to other cities, perhaps even bringing the model to the US and Europe.

For now, however, those who are interested can book time at the Tokyo arena here.

Commercial Human Spaceflight Advances Prompt Calls for Space Safety Institute

Commercial human spaceflight has been a long-held dream, but now it is finally poised to become a reality. Companies including Virgin Galactic and SpaceX are inching ever closer to taking private citizens into space, and there are serious plans for spaceports in several parts of the world, including Hawaii, the US, and Scotland, the UK.

But while the industry is advancing, the legal side of this fledgling commercial space industry remains underdeveloped, leading to calls for the development of an organisation to establish a framework for the safe operation of spaceports for human commercial spaceflights.

Writing in the journal New Space, Mclee Kerolle, from the United States International Institute of Space Law in Paris, France, has proposed the establishment of a Space Safety Institute recognised by the US congress and the United Nations.

This institute would “develop, enforce and adopt standards of excellence”, allowing the industry to develop while protecting it from liability and insurance risks.

“Currently, no international regulatory body exists to regulate the operation of spaceports,” he wrote. “This is unfortunate because while the advent of commercial human spaceflight industry is imminent, a majority of the focus from the legal community will be on regulating spaceflights and space access vehicles.

“However, the regulation of spaceports should be viewed in the same light as the rest of the commercial human spaceflight industry.”

The article focuses particularly on the establishment of a spaceport at the Kona International Airport in Keahole, Hawaii. At present, the spaceport’s development is subject to regulation by the Federal Aviation Authority, however there are aspects to spaceport development that do not apply to conventional aviation operations.

A spacesuit design for commercial flights developed by SpaceX. Featured image: SpaceX’s proposed spaceport for its conceptual interplanetary transport system. All images courtesy of SpaceX

The institute would be designed to first and foremost ensure safety within the industry, so it would be important, according to Kerolle, to ensure it was made up of individuals with expertise in the field, rather than bureaucrats.

“To make sure that this flexibility is inherent in a Space Safety Institute, the organization should be composed of individuals within the industry as opposed to government officials who are not familiar with the commercial human spaceflight industry,” he wrote.

“As a result, this should protect the commercial human spaceflight industry to some liability exposure, as well as promote growth in the industry to ensure the industry’s survival.”