The desire to wear wearables is waning. It’s time for the fashion industry to step up to the plate

Fashion and tech have been uneasy bedfellows at times, but there are a number of designers who are combining the two to great effect. We look at whether it will be the creative output from the fashion industry that puts wearable tech back in vogue

Of the few industries still interested in infusing the things we wear everyday with tech, it’d take a brave man to bet against the fashion industry – rather than VR headset makers, or fitness fanatics – being the ones to make wearable tech wearable.

But making wearables desirable, rather than just functional, isn’t a simple task; it means taking traditionally hard and cold wearable technology, smashing it together with the delicate world of fashion, and hoping that what you come out with is clothing that is fashionable, alluring, empowering and techy.

There are some companies finding ways to do just that, but, as a way of demonstrating the problems associated with combining the worlds of fashion and tech, I just wanted to share some of the more illogical, Derek Zoolander-inspired comments made by representatives for the fashion industry at the Wearable Technology Show 2017 (names have been omitted to save the speakers’ blushes).

Image courtesy of The Unseen

“Fashion is just like skin and wearable technology is just like a vitamin.” It’s not really though is it.

“We all wear clothes of some sort, all the time, whoever we are, whatever we’re doing.” No shit.

“I’m staggered by how many wipes there are in industry today and everywhere you see ‘please do not throw it down the loo’. Why are we using them? What was the matter with old-fashioned tissues, or cloth or anything else. I mean it is really indescribable how big the non-woven wipes market is, and I think it’s very dangerous. I think it’s very, very dangerous.” Yes, this person did take to the stage at a conference about wearable technology to rant about how wet wipes are “dangerous”, “very, very dangerous”.

Innovative or kitsch?

Back in the nineties, Francesca Rosella worked as a designer for the Italian fashion brand Valentino. Now, together with trained artist and anthropologist Ryan Genz, Rosella is creative director of CuteCircuit, a startup fashion label, launched in 2004, that is using smart textiles and micro-electronics to build beautiful, functional garments. The company’s pièce de résistance is undoubtedly its graphene dress, which records and analyses the wearer’s breathing patterns and reacts to whether heavy or light breaths are taken. Deep breaths turn the lights on the dress from purple to turquoise, while lighter ones make the dress switch from orange to green.

While CuteCircuit has been praised for its creativity, some of its other work shows how fine the line is between an innovation and a gimmick in wearable tech. The company was responsible for a haute couture Twitter Dress that could receive tweets in real-time. It’s not too great a leap from a dress that receives tweets to a dress that changes colour depending on your breathing, but to some the Twitter dress is on the wrong side of the gaudy/innovative border.

“Technology for technology’s sake is very gimmicky and very kitsch, and this is no disrespect to Cute Circuit because they’re a fantastic brand. The graphene dress: beautiful, stunning exciting, interesting, intriguing. A dress that you can send tweets to is probably the most gimmicky thing I’ve ever heard of,” said Sanj Surati, head of digital and innovation at communications agency Village.

“There are problems with the fashion technology world because the assumption is technology has to be functional and it has to give you something, and that application of thought when you’re trying to be creative is very stifling. Where the line is, I don’t know because when it comes to fashion it’s all subjective: there’s things you like and there’s things you don’t like.”

On the high street

Although the “we all wear clothes of some sort, all the time, whoever we are, whatever we’re doing,” quote sounds ridiculous to me, there is a serious point being made by that commentator. There’s a great amount of data to be collected from fashion, and that presents a great opportunity to fashion brands. So far, though, it’s high-end and luxury brands who are willing to get involved, while high-street brands appear reluctant to experiment with tech.

“Some of them [the high-street brands], as grandiose as they are, are very risk adverse, very traditional; they don’t want to take chances,” said Surati. “Usually the conversations they have with tech businesses are: look you work with us, we work with you, we won’t pay you for anything, but you’ll get loads of PR from the fact that you worked with Topshop or H&M etc.

I think a lot of those brands have got loads of money, but no ambition. They’re not seeing the value of what these tech startups are coming up with, and what they bring to the table

“I think a lot of those brands have got loads of money, but no ambition. They’re not seeing the value of what these tech startups are coming up with, and what they bring to the table.”

What we’ve seen so far are one-off haute couture dresses that are combined with wearable tech, rather than less expensive alternatives that are available to all. Luckily, fashion does work on the trickle down approach, so items that begin as high-end usually find their way to the high street. To date though, we haven’t definitively decided what the high-end of this market should look like, but as Elena Corchero, director of design research at Lost Values, says, falling costs will allow for more elaborate designs that still allow the conservative fashion industry to maintain the sanctity of, and artistry within, the atelier.

“Technologies in general are looking quite minimalist and quite safe aesthetically just because they try to reach everyone because developing these technologies is expensive,” said Corchero. “The more affordable they become I hope we can then start testing the different markets, some people love the whole blinking, blinking thing.

“I think understanding the market you’re trying to reach instead of trying to please everyone is the next stage.”

Combining art and science

Whether techy textiles make their way to the high street or not, wearable technology will allow the fashion industry to explore new creative endeavours. What it also allows is a romance between the worlds of art and science and that should also be celebrated even if the resultant products aren’t as wearable as they should be at the moment.

“There’s this fantastic material scientist, her name’s Lauren Bowker, she runs a brand called The Unseen,” said Surati. “She wanted to create a dress that basically changed colour depending on what you were thinking. It was a very beautiful piece of clothing, but no one could wear it because the ceramic fibres would heat up and it would burn you, but we basically built this dress, and developed it in partnership with her.

“It was absolutely beautiful,” said Surati. “We PR’d the hell out of it, and everyone started flying in from all over the world to see this dress. That dress wasn’t very practical, but it didn’t matter, this was her trying to express herself. You had to put on a EG headset for it to change colour, and we didn’t know what the colours meant – we didn’t know what emotion attributed to what colour – but it was so cool that the head atelier of Victoria Secret – one of the most profitable fashion businesses in the world – flew in to see this dress because they were interested in this new art form, which is what we’re building today.

“What everyone here is building today is new forms of being creative, and that’s exciting.”

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Juno mission: Jupiter’s magnetic field is even weirder than expected

It has long been known that Jupiter has the most intense magnetic field in the solar system, but the first round of results from NASA’s Juno mission has revealed that it is far stronger and more misshapen than scientists predicted.

Announcing the findings of the spacecraft’s first data-collection pass, which saw Juno fly within 2,600 miles (4,200km) of Jupiter on 27th August 2016, NASA mission scientists revealed that the planet far surpassed the expectations of models.

Measuring Jupiter’s magnetosphere using Juno’s magnetometer investigation (MAG) tool, they found that the planet’s magnetic field is even stronger than models predicted, at 7.766 Gaus: 10 times stronger than the strongest fields on Earth.

Furthermore, it is far more irregular in shape, prompting a re-think about how it could be generated.

“Juno is giving us a view of the magnetic field close to Jupiter that we’ve never had before,” said Jack Connerney, Juno deputy principal investigator and magnetic field investigation lead at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

“Already we see that the magnetic field looks lumpy: it is stronger in some places and weaker in others.

An enhanced colour view of Jupiter’s south pole. Image courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gabriel Fiset. Featured image courtesy of NASA/SWRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran

At present, scientists cannot say for certain why or how Jupiter’s magnetic field is so peculiar, but they do already have a theory: that the field is not generated from the planet’s core, but in a layer closer to its surface.

“This uneven distribution suggests that the field might be generated by dynamo action closer to the surface, above the layer of metallic hydrogen,” said Connerney.

However, with many more flybys planned, the scientists will considerable opportunities to learn more about this phenomenon, and more accurately pinpoint the bizarre magnetic field’s cause.

“Every flyby we execute gets us closer to determining where and how Jupiter’s dynamo works,” added Connerney.

With each flyby, which occurs every 53 days, the scientists are treated to a 6MB haul of newly collected information, which takes around 1.5 days to transfer back to Earth.

“Every 53 days, we go screaming by Jupiter, get doused by a fire hose of Jovian science, and there is always something new,” said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

A newly released image of Jupiter’s stormy south pole. Image courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles

An unexpected magnetic field was not the only surprise from the first data haul. The mission also provided a first-look at Jupiter’s poles, which are unexpectedly covered in swirling, densely clustered storms the size of Earth.

“We’re puzzled as to how they could be formed, how stable the configuration is, and why Jupiter’s north pole doesn’t look like the south pole,” said Bolton. “We’re questioning whether this is a dynamic system, and are we seeing just one stage, and over the next year, we’re going to watch it disappear, or is this a stable configuration and these storms are circulating around one another?”

Juno’s Microwave Radiometer (MWR) also threw up some surprises, with some of the planet’s belts appearing to penetrate down to its surface, while others seem to evolve into other structures. It’s a curious phenomenon, and one which the scientists hope to better explore on future flybys.

“On our next flyby on July 11, we will fly directly over one of the most iconic features in the entire solar system – one that every school kid knows – Jupiter’s Great Red Spot,” said Bolton.

“If anybody is going to get to the bottom of what is going on below those mammoth swirling crimson cloud tops, it’s Juno and her cloud-piercing science instruments.”