Colour-changing windows get a palette upgrade

A new research paper could show how to easily and inexpensively expand the colour palette for glass that changes colour based on voltage. Researchers working on nanophotonics at Rice University have released a new report detailing how the use of the hydrocarbon molecule perylene can create glass able to turn two different colours at low voltage.

“When we put charges on the molecules or remove charges from them, they go from clear to a vivid color,” said Halas, director of the Laboratory for Nanophotonics (LANP), lead scientist on the new study and the director of Rice’s Smalley-Curl Institute.

“We sandwiched these molecules between glass, and we’re able to make something that looks like a window, but the window changes to different types of colour depending on how we apply a very low voltage.”

The new colour-changing glass varies its colouration depending on polarity, meaning that a positive voltage will produce one colour and a negative voltage another. The importance of the Rice team’s new method is that until now, multicolour varieties of such glass have required a much more significant voltage, limiting their use.

The type of glass itself, changing colour as a result of applied voltage, is known as electrochromic  glass and is enjoying growing popularity. The market for such material has been estimated at a value of more than $2.5bn by 2020. Aside from the visual appeal, electrochromic glass is in demand for its light and heat-blocking properties.

Grant Stec and Adam Lauchner of Rice University’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics show off the glass. Images courtesy of Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

In 2013, then-Rice physicist Alejandro Manjavacas found that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the family of molecules that perylene belongs to, with just a few carbon rings should produce visible plasmons. There are dozens of PAHs, all of which contain rings of carbon atoms that are decorated with hydrogen atoms.

Waves of energy that can interact with and harvest energy from passing light depending on their frequency, plasmons are a rhythmic movement in the sea of electrons that constantly flow across the surface of conductive nanoparticles. Building off Manjavacas’ work, the researchers were able to work out that the PAH plasmons were highly sensitive to charge, leading them to the conclusion they could be easily utilised for electrochromic glass.

“Dr Halas learned that one of the major hurdles in the electrochromic device industry was making a window that could be clear in one state and completely black in another,” study co-lead author Grant Stec said. “We set out to do that and found a combination of PAHs that captured no visible light at zero volts and almost all visible light at low voltage.”

The new project took almost two years to complete and relied on Stec’s design of the perylene-containing nonwater-based conductive gel that’s sandwiched between glass layers. In experimenting with the assembled window, the team found that just 4 volts was enough to turn the clear window greenish-yellow, and applying negative 3.5 volts turned it blue.

Later in the project, the team produced a second window capable of going from clear to black. In all their experiments, they found that the colour change takes a few minutes but Halas said that the transition time is improvable with additional engineering.

Oxford University develops new 3D bioprinter

University of Oxford scientists have developed a new method for 3D printing laboratory-grown cells to form living structures. The new method enables the production of complex tissues and cartilage that can potentially support, repair and augment diseased and damaged areas of the body.

Google spinoff patents flexible cars that protect pedestrians

Waymo has patented a car design that is capable of becoming flexible or rigid depending on need, so if sensors detect the vehicle is about to hit another object the car would change accordingly. If it’s another car, the car could turn stiff; if it’s a human, the car could loosen up and soften its impact.

Source: The Verge

Researcher who killed WannaCry denies writing banking malware

Marcus Hutchins, the British security researcher credited with halting the virulent WannaCry ransomware worm that shut down computers worldwide in May, pleaded not guilty to unrelated charges that he created and distributed malware that steals banking credentials.

Source: Ars Technica

Record-sized data centre to be built inside Arctic Circle

US-Norwegian firm Kolos has revealed plans to build the world's largest data centre in the town of Ballangen, inside the Arctic Circle. The centre will cover 600,000 square metres over four stories, and would eventually draw on over 1,000MW of power.

Source: BBC

AI bot competes in e-sports tournament and wins

A bot from Elon Musk's artificial intelligence company OpenAI has beaten one of the world's best players of the e-sports video game "Dota 2". OpenAI's bot won a 1v1 match, but the company says it hopes to have it ready to compete in a five-on-five match next year.

Scientists solve the mystery of the "Frankenstein dinosaur"

Scientists have solved the puzzle of the so-called "Frankenstein dinosaur", which seems to consist of body parts from unrelated species. A new study suggests that it is in fact the missing link between plant-eating dinosaurs and carnivorous dinosaurs.

Source: BBC

Steve “Woz” Wozniak to advise hologram emoji company that he calls “groundbreaking”

Apple’s co-founder Steve “Woz” Wozniak has found himself a new gig; Woz has joined the hologram emoji company, Mojiit, as an adviser.

In his role as advisor to Mojiit, the legendary entrepreneur and engineer will help assemble a world-class engineering team in addition to bringing investors and partnerships to the newly launched startup. Wozniak will also serve as mentor to Mojiit founder, Jeremy Greene.

“I’m thrilled to join Mojiit as an advisor,” said Wozniak. “Jeremy is a natural leader, the company is groundbreaking, it’s going to change the ecommerce space, and it’s a lot of fun.”

Created in 2017, Mojiit is the latest startup technology venture from Greene. The company’s tech essentially enables users to project and share 3D hologram emojis via smartphones.

The platform turns users into emojis by scanning their face, which can then be sent to loved ones and friends. Once a Mojiit message is received, it will map the area where it is received and place the Mojiit hologram there in real time, so it works in a similar way to Pokemon Go.

“Steve is one of the best and brilliant engineers in the entire world. But outside of that, he’s a wonderful man,” said Greene. “There isn’t anyone I’d want to be in business with more than this guy. He’s a legend. Who better to learn from than the guy who created the computer?”

Image courtesy of Nichollas Harrison. Featured image courtesy of Mojiit

In addition to consumer use, businesses of all kinds can tap into hologram emojis with Mojiit’s technology.

Mojiit investors already  include NFL alum Ed Reed, and the company was able to raise a total of $1 million in its seed round of funding.

Alongside the appointment of Woz, Entourage and Ballers producer Rob Weiss recently joined the company as a creative director.

“It’s exciting to expand beyond television and film to digital platforms,” said Weiss. “Hologram technology brings incredible opportunity to entertainment and media. I’m thrilled to be leading creative at Mojiit.”