In a galaxy not so far away: 6 pieces of Star Wars tech that have (sort of) entered reality

Star Wars day has rolled around once again and to celebrate, we’re taking a look at some of the tech from the galaxy far, far away that has managed to find its way from fiction to reality.

While you won’t be making the Kessel Run for the foreseeable future, you could well see some of the below creeping more and more into everyday life. May the Fourth be with you.

R2-D2: The Knightscope security bot

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Knightscope

So yes, R2 was technically meant for ships not security, but the films always hammered home that he is almost absurdly multipurpose. And while I’m not sure he ever showed any particular forensic capabilities as displayed by his real-life Knightscope counterpart, that little taser seems pretty handy for security jobs. Looking somewhere between R2 and a Dalek, the Knightscope bot is designed to put a bit more tech into the security field while removing human guards from potential harm’s way.

Take some of its capabilities in a somewhat less law enforcement direction and, until we have X-wings to stick him in, you practically have your very own friendly astromech.

Landspeeders/Hoverbikes: The Malloy Hoverbike

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Malloy Aeronautics

I’m personally convinced that the hoverbikes of the Star Wars universe would result in far more deaths than the already risky motorbikes, given that they seem to travel at speeds your eyes would definitely struggle to keep up with. Seriously, why would you fly these things on a moon that is almost entirely forest?

However, that’s not to say we shouldn’t take influence from them and their more sedate cousin, the landspeeder, as with the Malloy Hoverbike. Utilising four rotors, the Hoverbike is able to fly to the same height and at the same speed as a typical light helicopter while also able to safely operate close to the ground. Just maybe steer clear of teddy bears.

Luke’s cybernetic hand: Bionic limbs

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Cybathlon

Artificial limbs have been around for a while now but we’re still working towards the ideal shown with a cybernetic replacement like Luke Skywalker’s. We can replace a limb, but until it can work as smoothly as a real limb, we’ve still got a way to go.

However, the field is constantly advancing, even today a new bionic hand has been reported on that is able to “see” objects and instantly decide on the necessary grip. We’re not recommending limb loss, but it’s nice to know that should something horrific happen that perfect Luke cosplay is closer than ever.

Hologram communications: Microsoft’s HoloLens

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Microsoft

It’s one of the most iconic moments in the franchise: “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope.” However, while communication technology is pretty much steamrolling forward, we’re yet to have friends popping out of our phones with their messages.

Perhaps not for much longer though, as Microsoft’s HoloLens can be used to pull up Skype video calls as holographic panels or send short holographic scenes to friends. It can’t be too long before all those annoying memes can be projecting directly out to you rather than quietly sitting unread.

C-3PO: The Romeo humanoid robot

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Aldebaran Robotics

He’s a little shorter than C-3PO, and knows a hell of a lot less languages, but the Romeo robot is one of the closer attempts we have to creating a humanoid robot for the purpose of companion-like assistance to humans.

Able to open doors, climb stairs and reach objects on a table, Romeo is not so much for helping fancy Senators or assuming deity over Ewoks, but is intended to work as an assistant to the elderly and those losing autonomy. However, stick a bunch more vocabulary into him and up the snootiness and you’ve got yourself a protocol droid.

Lightsabers: This flaming safety hazard of awesomeness

I don’t really know what can be said for this that the video doesn’t show off. It is a handle that mixes methanol and acetone before propelling them out of a nozzle at the top of the handle with butane.

A heated coil then sets the mix alight and you get a reasonable facsimile of a lightsabre. It won’t be melting through blast doors anytime soon, but for looks and risks to younglings alone, you’re unlikely to do much better.

Wishing you a futuristic Christmas and a fantastic New Year from team Factor

Factor is taking a break for the Christmas season, but we’ll be returning in January for more futuristic news and features.

Until then, check out our stunning new digital magazine, which is free to read on any device for your future fix.

From the issues of today, to the future of tomorrow and beyond, there’s something for everyone, from flying cars and Richard Stallman on privacy to life in the 22nd century and the space colonies of the future human race. There’s even a look at the Christmas dinners of the future.

And if you’re still looking for presents, check out of bumper futuristic gift guide for ideas to suit every budget.

Merry Christmas, and see you in 2018!

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