In a galaxy not so far away: 6 pieces of Star Wars tech that have (sort of) entered reality

Star Wars day has rolled around once again and to celebrate, we’re taking a look at some of the tech from the galaxy far, far away that has managed to find its way from fiction to reality.

While you won’t be making the Kessel Run for the foreseeable future, you could well see some of the below creeping more and more into everyday life. May the Fourth be with you.

R2-D2: The Knightscope security bot

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Knightscope

So yes, R2 was technically meant for ships not security, but the films always hammered home that he is almost absurdly multipurpose. And while I’m not sure he ever showed any particular forensic capabilities as displayed by his real-life Knightscope counterpart, that little taser seems pretty handy for security jobs. Looking somewhere between R2 and a Dalek, the Knightscope bot is designed to put a bit more tech into the security field while removing human guards from potential harm’s way.

Take some of its capabilities in a somewhat less law enforcement direction and, until we have X-wings to stick him in, you practically have your very own friendly astromech.

Landspeeders/Hoverbikes: The Malloy Hoverbike

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Malloy Aeronautics

I’m personally convinced that the hoverbikes of the Star Wars universe would result in far more deaths than the already risky motorbikes, given that they seem to travel at speeds your eyes would definitely struggle to keep up with. Seriously, why would you fly these things on a moon that is almost entirely forest?

However, that’s not to say we shouldn’t take influence from them and their more sedate cousin, the landspeeder, as with the Malloy Hoverbike. Utilising four rotors, the Hoverbike is able to fly to the same height and at the same speed as a typical light helicopter while also able to safely operate close to the ground. Just maybe steer clear of teddy bears.

Luke’s cybernetic hand: Bionic limbs

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Cybathlon

Artificial limbs have been around for a while now but we’re still working towards the ideal shown with a cybernetic replacement like Luke Skywalker’s. We can replace a limb, but until it can work as smoothly as a real limb, we’ve still got a way to go.

However, the field is constantly advancing, even today a new bionic hand has been reported on that is able to “see” objects and instantly decide on the necessary grip. We’re not recommending limb loss, but it’s nice to know that should something horrific happen that perfect Luke cosplay is closer than ever.

Hologram communications: Microsoft’s HoloLens

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Microsoft

It’s one of the most iconic moments in the franchise: “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope.” However, while communication technology is pretty much steamrolling forward, we’re yet to have friends popping out of our phones with their messages.

Perhaps not for much longer though, as Microsoft’s HoloLens can be used to pull up Skype video calls as holographic panels or send short holographic scenes to friends. It can’t be too long before all those annoying memes can be projecting directly out to you rather than quietly sitting unread.

C-3PO: The Romeo humanoid robot

Composite: Images courtesy of 20th Century Fox / Aldebaran Robotics

He’s a little shorter than C-3PO, and knows a hell of a lot less languages, but the Romeo robot is one of the closer attempts we have to creating a humanoid robot for the purpose of companion-like assistance to humans.

Able to open doors, climb stairs and reach objects on a table, Romeo is not so much for helping fancy Senators or assuming deity over Ewoks, but is intended to work as an assistant to the elderly and those losing autonomy. However, stick a bunch more vocabulary into him and up the snootiness and you’ve got yourself a protocol droid.

Lightsabers: This flaming safety hazard of awesomeness

I don’t really know what can be said for this that the video doesn’t show off. It is a handle that mixes methanol and acetone before propelling them out of a nozzle at the top of the handle with butane.

A heated coil then sets the mix alight and you get a reasonable facsimile of a lightsabre. It won’t be melting through blast doors anytime soon, but for looks and risks to younglings alone, you’re unlikely to do much better.

Steve “Woz” Wozniak to advise hologram emoji company that he calls “groundbreaking”

Apple’s co-founder Steve “Woz” Wozniak has found himself a new gig; Woz has joined the hologram emoji company, Mojiit, as an adviser.

In his role as advisor to Mojiit, the legendary entrepreneur and engineer will help assemble a world-class engineering team in addition to bringing investors and partnerships to the newly launched startup. Wozniak will also serve as mentor to Mojiit founder, Jeremy Greene.

“I’m thrilled to join Mojiit as an advisor,” said Wozniak. “Jeremy is a natural leader, the company is groundbreaking, it’s going to change the ecommerce space, and it’s a lot of fun.”

Created in 2017, Mojiit is the latest startup technology venture from Greene. The company’s tech essentially enables users to project and share 3D hologram emojis via smartphones.

The platform turns users into emojis by scanning their face, which can then be sent to loved ones and friends. Once a Mojiit message is received, it will map the area where it is received and place the Mojiit hologram there in real time, so it works in a similar way to Pokemon Go.

“Steve is one of the best and brilliant engineers in the entire world. But outside of that, he’s a wonderful man,” said Greene. “There isn’t anyone I’d want to be in business with more than this guy. He’s a legend. Who better to learn from than the guy who created the computer?”

Image courtesy of Nichollas Harrison. Featured image courtesy of Mojiit

In addition to consumer use, businesses of all kinds can tap into hologram emojis with Mojiit’s technology.

Mojiit investors already  include NFL alum Ed Reed, and the company was able to raise a total of $1 million in its seed round of funding.

Alongside the appointment of Woz, Entourage and Ballers producer Rob Weiss recently joined the company as a creative director.

“It’s exciting to expand beyond television and film to digital platforms,” said Weiss. “Hologram technology brings incredible opportunity to entertainment and media. I’m thrilled to be leading creative at Mojiit.”

Nanoengineers send antibiotic-delivering micromotors into the body to treat cancer-causing infection

Nanoengineers have demonstrated for the first time how “micromotors” that measure half the width of a human hair can be used to transport antibiotics through the body.

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego tested the micromotors in mice with Helicobacter pylori infections, which can also be found in about two-thirds of the world’s population and while many people will never notice any signs of its presence it can cause peptic ulcers and stomach cancer.

The mice received the micromotors – packed with a clinical dose of the antibiotic clarithromycin – orally once a day for five consecutive days.

Afterwards, nanoengineers evaluated the bacterial count in each mouse stomach and found that treatment with the micromotors was slightly more effective than when the same dose of antibiotic was given in combination with proton pump inhibitors, which also suppress gastric acid production.

Micromotors administered to the mice swam rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralising gastric acid, which can be destructive to orally administered drugs such as antibiotics and protein-based pharmaceuticals.

Because gastric acid is so destructive to traditional antibiotics drugs used to treat bacterial infections, ulcers and other diseases in the stomach are normally taken with additional substances, called proton pump inhibitors.

But when taken over longer periods or in high doses, proton pump inhibitors can cause adverse side effects including headaches, diarrhea and fatigue. In more serious cases, they can cause anxiety or depression.

The micromotors, however, have a built-in mechanism that neutralises gastric acid and effectively deliver their drug payloads in the stomach without requiring the use of proton pump inhibitors.

“It’s a one-step treatment with these micromotors, combining acid neutralisation with therapeutic action,” said Berta Esteban-Fernández de Ávila, a postdoctoral scholar in Wang’s research group at UC San Diego and a co-first author of the paper.

The nanoengineers say that while the present results are promising, this work is still at an early stage.

To test their work, the team is planning future studies to into the therapeutic performance of the micromotors in animals and humans, and will compare it with other standard therapies used to combat stomach diseases.

UC San Diego nanoengineers also plan to test different drug combinations with the micromotors to treat multiple diseases in the stomach or in different sections of the gastrointestinal tract.

Overall, the researchers say that this work opens the door to the use of synthetic motors as active delivery platforms in the treatment of diseases.

Image and video courtesy of the Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics at UC San Diego.