Volkswagen presents the campervan of the future

Volkswagen has presented their answer to the campervan of the future, in the form of the I.D. Buzz concept car. Currently being shown off at the North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit, the microbus is electric, all-wheel drive and zero emission.

The Buzz has a range of up to 600km, contains eight seats and space for bikes and boards. The VW campervan has long been a nostalgic throwback and it seems that Volkswagen is determined to build on such an icon and transform it into something a little more suitable for the future.

“The I.D. Buzz stands for the new Volkswagen: modern, positive, emotional, future-orientated. By 2025, we want to sell one million electric cars per year, making e-mobility the new trademark of Volkswagen,” explained Dr Herbert Diess, chairman of the Volkswagen Brand Board of Management.

“The new e-Golf2 already offers 50 percent more electric range. From 2020 onwards we will then launch our ID.family, a new generation of fully electric, fully connected cars. It will be affordable for millions, not just to millionaires.”

The Buzz builds on the I.D.3, Volkswagen’s compact electric car that was the first to go into production based on a new Modular Electric Drive Kit (MEB) and the first VW concept car that can be driven in fully automated mode. The Buzz is now the first minivan to do so and manages the feat with a certain flare.

By pushing the wheel, it melts back into the cockpit of the car and shifts the Buzz into automated mode. In this mode, as the car drives you can spin the driver’s seat to face your passengers while a variety of sensors and cameras, combined with traffic data from the cloud, keep you from a fiery death.

More futuristic yet however, are the augmented reality features. As opposed to a conventional cockpit, the vehicle projects key information via a heads-up display. No longer confined to managing your info via dials or a console hub, it’ll now be 3D and virtual. Additionally, the main controls will all be on the wheel and function through a capacitive touchpad embedded in the wheel.

Images courtesy of Volkswagen

One thing is for sure, this isn’t the hippy-mobile that the classic VW van became iconic as. Whether or not it’s a vehicle we’ll ever realistically see on the road is uncertain but, if successfully manufactured, what the Buzz offers is an experience unlike others.

Currently, there is a big push for autonomous vehicles across brands. This concept goes beyond that idea, however, and it seems that the driving experience is focused on turning the car more into a gadget than just a means of transportation.

The Buzz, alongside its sister I.D.3, does not yet have approvals for sale, and there is no fixed release date for it. The car is currently on display at the NAIAS as part of Volkswagen’s “We make the future real” brand strategy.

Soviet report detailing lunar rover Lunokhod-2 released for first time

Russian space agency Roskosmos has released an unprecedented scientific report into the lunar rover Lunokhod-2 for the first time, revealing previously unknown details about the rover and how it was controlled back on Earth.

The report, written entirely in Russian, was originally penned in 1973 following the Lunokhod-2 mission, which was embarked upon in January of the same year. It had remained accessible to only a handful of experts at the space agency prior to its release today, to mark the 45th anniversary of the mission.

Bearing the names of some 55 engineers and scientists, the report details the systems that were used to both remotely control the lunar rover from a base on Earth, and capture images and data about the Moon’s surface and Lunokhod-2’s place on it. This information, and in particularly the carefully documented issues and solutions that the report carries, went on to be used in many later unmanned missions to other parts of the solar system.

As a result, it provides a unique insight into this era of space exploration and the technical challenges that scientists faced, such as the low-frame television system that functioned as the ‘eyes’ of the Earth-based rover operators.

A NASA depiction of the Lunokhod mission. Above: an image of the rover, courtesy of NASA, overlaid onto a panorama of the Moon taken by Lunokhod-2, courtesy of Ruslan Kasmin.

One detail that main be of particular interest to space enthusiasts and experts is the operation of a unique system called Seismas, which was tested for the first time in the world during the mission.

Designed to determine the precise location of the rover at any given time, the system involved transmitting information over lasers from ground-based telescopes, which was received by a photodetector onboard the lunar rover. When the laser was detected, this triggered the emission of a radio signal back to the Earth, which provided the rover’s coordinates.

Other details, while technical, also give some insight into the culture of the mission, such as the careful work to eliminate issues in the long-range radio communication system. One issue, for example, was worked on with such thoroughness that it resulted in one of the devices using more resources than it was allocated, a problem that was outlined in the report.

The document also provides insight into on-Earth technological capabilities of the time. While it is mostly typed, certain mathematical symbols have had to be written in by hand, and the report also features a number of diagrams and graphs that have been painstakingly hand-drawn.

A hand-drawn graph from the report, showing temperature changes during one of the monitoring sessions during the mission

Lunokhod-2 was the second of two unmanned lunar rovers to be landed on the Moon by the Soviet Union within the Lunokhod programme, having been delivered via a soft landing by the unmanned Luna 21 spacecraft in January 1973.

In operation between January and June of that year, the robot covered a distance of 39km, meaning it still holds the lunar distance record to this day.

One of only four rovers to be deployed on the lunar surface, Lunokhod-2 was the last rover to visit the Moon until December 2013, when Chinese lunar rover Yutu made its maiden visit.

Robot takes first steps towards building artificial lifeforms

A robot equipped with sophisticated AI has successfully simulated the creation of artificial lifeforms, in a key first step towards the eventual goal of creating true artificial life.

The robot, which was developed by scientists at the University of Glasgow, was able to model the creation of artificial lifeforms using unstable oil-in-water droplets. These droplets effectively played the role of living cells, demonstrating the potential of future research to develop living cells based on building blocks that cannot be found in nature.

Significantly, the robot also successfully predicted their properties before they were created, even though this could not be achieved using conventional physical models.

The robot, which was designed by Glasgow University’s Regius Chair of Chemistry, Professor Lee Cronin, is driven by machine learning and the principles of evolution.

It has been developed to autonomously create oil-in-water droplets with a host of different chemical makeups and then use image recognition to assess their behaviour.

Using this information, the robot was able to engineer droplets to have different properties­. Those which were found to be desirable could then be recreated at any time, using a specific digital code.

“This work is exciting as it shows that we are able to use machine learning and a novel robotic platform to understand the system in ways that cannot be done using conventional laboratory methods, including the discovery of ‘swarm’ like group behaviour of the droplets, akin to flocking birds,” said Cronin.

“Achieving lifelike behaviours such as this are important in our mission to make new lifeforms, and these droplets may be considered ‘protocells’ – simplified models of living cells.”

One of the oil droplets created by the robot

The research, which is published today in the journal PNAS, is one of several research projects being undertaken by Cronin and his team within the field of artificial lifeforms.

While the overarching goal is moving towards the creation of lifeforms using new and unprecedented building blocks, the research may also have more immediate potential applications.

The team believes that their work could also have applications in several practical areas, including the development of new methods for drug delivery or even innovative materials with functional properties.